EMG/NCS

What is an EMG/NCS?

An electromyography (EMG) measures muscle response or electrical activity in response to a nerve’s stimulation of the muscle.  A nerve conduction study (NCS) also known as a nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measures how fast an electrical impulse moves through your nerve.  This can help to identify nerve damage.

Why did the Clinician order this exam/study?

Your clinician might have ordered this test based on symptoms such as numbness or tingling in extremities or to rule out Carpel Tunnel Syndrome.

How do I prepare for this exam/study?

There is no preparation for this study.

Who will be administering the exam/study?

Our psychiatrist, Dr. Dave Hogarty will perform the test.

What will I experience during the exam/study?

For an EMG, you will be asked to remove any jewelry or other metal objects that could interfere with the procedure.  Depending on what part of the body the procedure is performed on, you will be asked to remove your clothing and will be provided with a gown.  You may be asked to sit or lie down for the procedure.  The clinician will locate the muscle or muscles to be studied.  The clinician will then cleanse the skin with antiseptic solution.  A small, sterile needle will be inserted into the muscle.  A ground electrode will be positioned under your arm or leg.  Multiple needle insertions may be necessary for the procedure.  Some people have reported having slight pain, but generally this is painless.   You will be asked to perform slight muscle contractions.  The clinician will the read and interpret the data.

For an NCS, you will be asked to remove any jewelry or other metal objects that could interfere with the procedure.  Depending on what part of the body the procedure is performed on you will be asked to remove your clothing and will be provided with a gown.  Sitting up or lying back on the exam table, the clinician will locate the nerve or nerves to be studied.  The clinician will attach a recording electrode to the skin over your nerve, using a special paste.  They will then place a stimulating electrode away for the recording electrode, at a specified distance.  A mild and brief electrical shock will stimulate the nerve.  You may experience some minor discomfort for only a few seconds.  The clinician will then read and interpret the data.

What should I do after the exam/study?

Some muscle soreness could persist for a day or so following an EMG.  If the soreness continues after 48 hours, please call our office for further assistance.

When will I receive the result of my exam/study?

You will receive the results of the study at your next follow up visit.  If you do not have a follow up visit scheduled, please call our office to schedule one.  If you have been referred to our office by your primary care provider, please contact their office for results.  Our office cannot review those results with you.  We will send over the report to your ordering clinician.